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. >> i'm told the earthquake that hit japan is the fifth most powerful ever recorded anywhere in the world. that is a powerful earthquake. in the u.s., is the design criteria for that level of earthquake or is it for an earthquake that would be the standard, the earthquake that hit san francisco in 1906? >> would you like me to answer? >> i would like you to answer. >> i tried to give a demonstration. we talk about the magnitude of the earthquake. that is not what the nrc look said. you look at the cup of water and think of it as a nuclear reactor. the earthquake would be -- probably should fall of the water glass. -- fill up the water glass. >> do it right. >> if you think of this as a nuclear power plan, the earthquake and when you talk about the magnitude of the earthquake, it would be hitting the table with my fist. something like that. you will see that it makes the glass of vibrate. that is what we actually measure and we design or nuclear power plants around is that shaking of the power plant. the actual impact depends upon where i hit and relatiin relatie glass. have a
countries like japan -- excuse me -- china and india. there is not a lot of overlap in those the use -- those views. you have an opportunity to agree with steve and me to come back where we can -- to come back to where we can get things done. you can make the case in a practical sense of what difference transit and your investment has made in your community, what difference it makes in terms of the fabric of the community, the environment, being able to deal with social equity. you have a case to make. i am proud of what we have done in portland, oregon over the last 30 years. transit made it possible for portland to be the nation's most popular european city. there is a joke about young people going there to retire. but the quality of life is good enough that people feel like they are retiring. we have an opportunity to stress in our downtown, our neighboring community. we give people transportation choices. there has been spectacular re- investment that would not have been possible had it not been for transit. we need you to advocate for what transit means to you now and what it wi
with us. "the new york times", and steve powers, energy reporters. you will get a status report on japan tomorrow. what you think you learn? guest: we will have a meeting with the full commission on the nrc. we will have a brief discussion on what kind of impact radiation could have for the public, and then we will take a look at some things, kind of a plan for a plant for how we intend to go forward and what kinds of things we may need to look at for u.s. nuclear reactors. host: with the fukushima plant in particular, at two of the six reactors are under control. japanese officials have indicated that this facility will have to be shut down. guest: we are continuing to monitor the situation. we have a team of nrc experts and tokyo and are working with their counterparts to get information. our focus is to ensure cooling for three of the reactors that were operating and to continue to work with the japanese to ensure that they can deal with the situation two of the spent fulel areas. host: do you have faith in the information you are getting from the japanese government? guest: right now
, what happened in japan, like everybody else. it's just so devastating. i can't imagine that there's going to be one agency in massachusetts who just says, you go here, you here -- i'm concerned not only in massachusetts but throughout the country if something like this happens, i'm not confident yet and i'm hopeful someone can give me the information that make sure that we all know what to do. you know? is it evacuation? is it command and control? is it military? i think it's a combination of everything. can you shed any light on my thoughts? >> in timely, i can start and then like to have an opportunity, senator brown -- >> just do that. i don't want to take the senator's time. >> i want to make one point. >> i think you're asking an important question. >> okay. >> i'd urge -- >> many of our disasters -- we always start with who's going to be the closest responders, no matter how big the disaster. it's always the local responders. we saw this, they can be destroyed, in the disaster itself. we saw this in katrina and in the tsunami. the next is the governor and their team includin
their estimate of the cost to japan, to claim that the wealth loss was almost $1 trillion. that is clearly not realistic at all. the drop has been too much. one reason is that the market has been then. there is not that much confidence in it. in europe, there has also been a drop in the stock market, but the same story. the u.s. stock market has been pretty resilient. nothing -- nothing much has really happened. maybe it is unfortunate, but japan is simply not a big market for the united states. we do not export much to anybody anymore. in particular we do not export a lot to japan. we worry about japan, it is too soon about a big interruption to our electronic and automobiles supplies. i do not expect that to happen. i do not think that what goes on in japan will have a big effect on the u.s. economy. >> yes, sir. >> there's not much talk about the radioactive effect on human beings. the radio act cavity in the air and in the mark -- and in the ocean, should we monitor it -- the radioactivity in the air and in the ocean, should we monitor it? and also, over the years, there is a province
. >> was the interview sunday night. -- watch the interview sunday night. >> could it congressional hearing on japan's nuclear plant today -- gregory jaszco said japanese emergency workers at one plant could face lethal levels of radiation while of it -- while advising americans to evacuate a wider area. this is two hours. >> we have a true expert and we feel very blessed that you could be here until the chairman comes. we will do this by order of arrival, back and forth, democrat-republican. but i will give each member 10 minutes so that we can press on some of these issues without having to rush hour questions. we are here to give a briefing on the ongoing crisis at the nuclear plant in japan. we will have a second panel including mr. anthony -- oh, boy, senior vice president and scientists.ar vic i appreciate all of our people ticking time out of their busy schedules. i know you're on television, answering questions, really teaching wallace -- teaching all of us the lessons that we have to take away from what is happening. the devastation in japan is heartbreaking. our thoughts and prayers go out
about the creation of a new financial regulatory agency. nucleare on at japan's power plant. the head of the nuclear regulatory commission discussed the emergency there, which may have exposed workers to lethal doses of radiation. this is the second part of a hearing on the house energy subcommittee. it is an hour and a half. >> i will call the meeting back to in order. you were called away for a meeting. everybody has given their opening statements. i would recognize you for 5 minutes for your opening statement. >> thank you to you, mr. chairman, you and the other chairman of the subcommittees. and other members of the subcommittee. i am honored to appear before you on behalf of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission. given the events unfolding overseas, my remarks will focus on the events in japan. i will be happy to answer questions on those matters. i would like to offer my condolences to all those affected by the earthquake and tsunami in japan over the last few days. my heart goes out to those dealing with the aftermath of these disasters. i want to indulge the tireless efforts
're having a hearing this morning on the nuclear reactor disaster in japan. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] >> ok, why don't we get started? thank you all for being here. this is a briefing, not a hearing as such. i think the reason we tried to do it as a briefing is so people would not have to file written testimony 72 hours ahead of time and all that. things are changing very quickly with regard to the evolving situation at the fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant. while this committee does not have oversight on the safety of u.s. nuclear plants, we do have to consider how events such as those at fukushima affected the ability of our nation's nuclear freedom, 104 reactors, to supply electricity. of course, these 104 reactors currently account for about 20% of the electricity that we use and what the future of nuclear energy will be as part of our nation's energy banks. events at fukushima are changing by the our. they are serious, and we are watching those events unfold on the other side of the world. our know
to "washington journal" on this wednesday, march 16, 2011. the latest from japan -- "the new york times" headline -- "second reactor may have ruptured." first, let's start with the war in afghanistan. do you think it is worth fighting? a "the washington post" abc news poll says 2/3 of americans say it is not. the numbers -- we also have a line set up for active duty military. you can also e-mail us and we are on twitter. we will read your tweets on the air this morning. this is the story in "the washington post" yesterday looking at the war in afghanistan. "the afghan war is not worth fighting, most in the u.s. say." host: what do you think? is the war in afghanistan worth fighting? do you think it has been productive so far? if you think this time for a pullout? fairfax, virginia. jack joins us. good morning. caller: good morning. i had a comment about the war and one other comment. i do not think it is worth fighting. we're spending $2 billion per week and countless companies are just taking this money. it cannot be accounted for. that is why i think the republicans are all four wards because t
implicates our energy security. the situation in japan leads us to ask questions about our energy sources. in an economy that relies so heavily on oil, rising prices at the pump affect everybody. workers, farmers, truck drivers, restaurant owners, students who are lucky enough to have a car. businesses, you see rising prices at the pump hurt their bottom line. families feel the pinch when they filled their tanks. and for americans who are struggling to get by, a hike in gas prices really makes their lives that much harder. it hurts. if you are somebody who works in a relatively low-wage job and you have a commute to work, it takes up a big chunk of your income. you may not be able to buy as many groceries. you may have to cut back on medicine in order to fill the gas tank. this is something that everybody is affected by. we have been down this road before. it was three years ago that gas prices topped four dollars a gallon. -- $4 a gallon on. i was in the middle of a presidential campaign. working folks remember because it hit a lot of people pretty hard. and because we're at the height o
to the earthquake and tsunami in japan. from the white house, this is about 50 minutes. >> good morning, everybody. before i begin, i want to say a few words about the terrible tsunami that struck japan today. first and foremost, our thoughts and prayers are with the people of japan. this is potentially a catastrophic disaster. images of the destruction and flooding coming out of japan are simply heartbreaking. japan is, of course, one of our strongest and closest allies. and this morning i spoke with prime minister kan. on behalf of the american people, i conveyed our deepest condolences and offered our japanese friends whatever assistance is needed. we currently have an aircraft carrier in japan, and another is on its way. we also have a ship en route to the islands to assist as needed. the defense department is working to account for all our military personnel in japan. u.s. embassy personnel in tokyo moved to an offsite location. and the state department is working to account for and assist any and all american citizens who are in the country. tsunami warnings have been issued across the pacif
by the magnitude until this disaster are closely following the events in japan and the repercussions in this country and in many other countries. before we begin, i would like to offer my sincere condolences to all of those who have been affected by the earthquake and the tsunami in japan. our hearts go out to all lead in dealing with the aftermath of these natural disasters. we are mindful of a long and difficult road they will face in recovering. we know the people of japan are resilience and strong and we have every confidence that they will come through this difficult time and move forward with resolved to rebuild their vibrant country. i believe i speak for all americans when i say that we stand together with the people of japan at this most difficult and challenging time. the nrc is a relatively small agency. we play a critical role in protecting american people and the environment when it comes to the use of nuclear materials. we have our inspectors to work full time as every nuclear plant in the country and we are proud to have world top scientists, engineers, and professiona
plants. now a look at her remarks. this is about 35 minutes. the earth shook in japan. 9.0 on the richter scale and the worst earthquake to hit japan in its recorded modern history. its epicenter was about 100 kilometers earth of the city of sen day and about -- sedona and about -- sendai and north of toke tokyo. a 10 meter high tsunami wave hit the east coast of the japanese main island of hunchu and created terrible devastation. the evening of the same day the news came that in one of the reactors of the nuclear facility in fukushima one the cooling system had failed and that in the facility a fire had broken out. the japanese government declared a nuclear state of emergency. during the following days and nights many aftershocks shook the country and it continues to this day. earthquakes and tsunamis have devastated large swaths of land of japan's northeast region and entire townships were obliterated. the number of victims is increasing. day by day. and we don't know actually how many they are. too many people are still mi
to friday's earthquake that killed more than 10,000. japan's prime minister says it was the worst crisis since world war ii. while japan works to control its nuclear facilities from a third explosion, here and the united states, some lawmakers are asking for a halt to our nuclear power facilities. your thoughts on the that this morning. we will begin with "the new york times" and their head line. "u.s. nuclear push may be in peril." also this morning, it notes and "the washington post" -- a wary look at u.s. nuclear plants. regulators are reviewing license applications for 20 reactors -- yesterday on the sunday show, senator joseph lieberman, independent, talked about whether or not to have a temporary halt on nuclear power. here is what he had to say. >> we have 104 nuclear power plants in our country. every year, once a year, fema, nuclear regulatory commission, they go through emergency planning to see what they would do if it's a disaster struck. -- if a disaster struck. the reality is we are watching something unfold and we do not know where it is going regarding nuclear power plant
, and continuing crises in japan and the budget story at home. the most significant new was story. we will go to your phone calls right away to hear what is most important to you in a week of unfolding big issues. we will go to the newspapers as we are waiting for your calls. as you can see, britain, france, and the united states are lined up for air strike against coffee -- gaddafi. it suggests in the newspapers the airplanes may well immediately. "the chicago tribune" tells us american officials expect the united states would do the heavy lifting in a campaign that may include air strikes on tanks and artillery and at the same time u.s. officials cautioned the united states and allies intend to limit their involvement, allowing for no troops on the ground. the libyan story, japan story, and the budget situation at home. the continuing resolution that punts the decisions on the budget until the beginning of april. they left town this friday morning. we would like to hear which of these stories are most important to you this friday morning. let's begin with a call from san antonio, texas. rob
. that is a completely separate matter. >> another question from the back. the lady. >> i am a historian of japan. i had a political question. criticism of the democratic party of japan for its handling, but there seem to be long term implications of the government. comparison being made with the earlier party. do they think the ldp would have done a better job? it seems to me that would pay half -- it would have to think that the other two would be better. >> the jury is not out on that question. >> still out. >> still loud, i am sorry. [laughter] i think they have a tremendous opportunity to prove that they are capable of being a ruling party that is as good or better than the ldp. if they fail to meet that challenge, then the sentiment will grow that maybe the ldp is the only one we can rely on, whatever their faults. >> i asked partly because i have a friend who is a supporter of the jdp and i think she's come panic richer -- comparing their reaction with the earlier party. i think she feels that they are at least trying to do better than the ldp and terms of getting the affirmation out. would you a
to be heartbroken by the images of devastation in japan. i know all of you young and old have been watching people magnitude of this tragedy unfold. i want to reiterate america's support for the people of japan. who are some of our closest friends and allies. i have said directly to the prime minister of japan, prime ministerkahn, the united states will offer any assistance we can as japan recovers from multiple disasters. we will stand with the people of japan in the difficult days ahead. i just had a chance to talk with some of your teachers as well as some students who told me about your all school project weaving the life and music of duke ellington into your glasses. by getting students engaged in learning, you are teaching the kind of skills about how to think and work together that young people will need in college and beyond. that is what all of our schools need to be doing. in an economy that is more competitive and connected than ever before, a good job and a good career is going to demand a good education. over the next 10 years, nearly half of all new jobs are going to require more tha
. one is honing her presidential qualifications. we will talk about japan in a few moments. this is the latest from "usa today." the death toll rises in japan. people are still being found alive. and 80 year old wrapped in a blanket found nine days after the earthquake in the tsunami hit. she and her grandson were rescued from their home in northern japan. phoenix, ariz.. what should the u.s. mission in libya be? caller: we should not be there right now. we are in bad shape energy wise, no renewable energy program like we should have. we are trying to get oil, in this case libya. next time maybe venezuela. that is instead of focusing on clean energy, not those that come down a radioactive plumes. nuclear is not clean energy. that is absurd. we are trying to get oil under any condition. right now it is libya. then iran and venezuela. read"shock doctrine." there will be a military coup in libya. there'll be no leadership for resistance. the military will take over and we will fund a ton of money to them. then we will privatize the oil industry and trigger it over to big oil i
.s. government officials near the nuclear plant. there also are urging u.s. citizens to defer traveling to japan. we will hear from patrick kennedy at a deputy assistant secretary for overseas citizens service, james petit. this is 35 minutes. >> happy st. patrick's day. let's get right to business. we are fortunate to have with us today, individuals that can help address your questions about recent developments in japan regarding american citizens. the voluntary departure order that went out last night, i know it kept some of you up late. we have someone back and also address the ongoing efforts to help american citizens in the affected areas. patrick kennedy and jim mpetit -- jim petit are here to answer your questions. we will go right to your questions. >> questions, anyone? >> when you implement it -- update offset some of the implementation of the measures you talked about last night? and the effort to evacuate americans that are in a 50-mile radius around the nuclear plant. there is a reasoning for authorized departure. is it because of the radiation concerns or the broader picture? >> w
district of south carolina to express our condolences to the folks, people of japan, in the wake of the 8.9 magnitude earthquake that struck off the northeast coast of japan this past friday. and the devastating tsunami that claimed the lives of thousands of people. i visited japan twice. once back in 2007, and again in 2009 where i took my oldest son. it's a beautiful country. and i know the people of japan to be a resilient, general russ -- generous, and hardworking people. in this time of inexpressable suffering and need, please know that the people of south carolina and the people of america stand with the citizens of japan. may god bless them, and may god continue to bless america. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from virginia, mr. connolly, for five minutes. mr. connolly: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, the year-long continuing resolution of the republicans in this house passed last month on a straight party-line vote represents misguided values. house republicans sought to cut an arbitrary amount of funding and did so with a meat axe, indiscriminate
and new technologies. we discussed the situation in japan. i want to reiterate how heartbroken whereby the images of the devastation. although japan is a highly advanced economy technologically equipped to rebuild, at this moment of crisis, all of us join together in providing any help and assistance we can in the days and months to come. i am in close contact with the prime minister and our teams are in close cooperation as is our military. we expect to continue to cooperate until we have some stabilization of the situation. prime minister rasmussen, thank you for the help you have provided to the u.s. and the leadership you have provided internationally. denmark is a country that punches above its way to. -- above its weight. we are glad about our relationship and we appreciate you took the time to visit us. >> thank you. thank you for your warm welcome and your great hospitality. i believe it is the true that denmark in the u.s. are close friends and fa allies. the bonds are strung between our governments and our peoples. ey then ian is the kin was glad to inform the president about
been talked -- touched by the magnitude until this disaster are closely following the events in japan and the repercussions in this country and in many other countries. before we begin, i would like to offer my sincere condolences to all of those who have been affected by the earthquake and the tsunami in japan. our hearts go out to all lead in dealing with the aftermath of these natural disasters. we are mindful of a long and difficult road they will face in recovering. we know the people of japan are resilience and strong and we have every confidence that they will come through this difficult time and move forward with resolved to rebuild their vibrant country. i believe i speak for all americans when i say that we stand together with the people of japan at this most difficult and challenging time. the nrc is a relatively small agency. we play a critical role in protecting american people and the environment when it comes to the use of nuclear materials. we have our inspectors to work full time as every nuclear plant in the country and we are proud to have world top scientists, engi
about the safety of nuclear power in the u.k. in light of recent events in japan. the labor leader asks the prime minister for an update in libya and whether arab leaders are still in support of coalition operations there. . . >> will [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] >> we will look at this in terms of foreign policy and military equipment as well. i would say that the strategic security review, the whole pred indication of -- predication of it was that we should be able to go anywhere in the world with special focus on things like transport. if there are further lessons to learn, we should learn them. >> as we look at japan and watch their horror unfold it is not just earthquakes and tsunami that can threaten a nuclear reactor. does the prime minister agree that what happened here will have consequences for the nuclear power in the u.k.? >> we want to join the gentle lady in sending our condolences to japan. we must learn everything we can learn, and that's why we are looking at this issue. the stations we have in britain are a dif
not abandon also the japan. we have not abandoned them. wherever we have investment ties. it is up to the country to look out and make sure that our investments bring a return. i think the president is a good soldier. he should keep his head up even though people comment that attack him attacked his personality, attacked his demeanor. he's a good soldier and he does not address that. he should keep fighting and holding our red white, and blue flag. host: we're going to continue our discussion on what you think the president ought to say in his address on monday regarding the u.s. involvement in libya. but right now we're going to take a break and talk about what's happening in canada and joining us is david akin, national bureau chief of the ottwa sun to help us understood what's happening. guest: hi. host: on the front page of your paper, tory's lose confidence of the house and the mps off to the races. tell us what's going on. guest: that's the front page in all our papers right across the chain in canada today. kind of an odd thing. we'r
. immediately you get the question, you design against those, but look at japan. if you had an earthquake with a magnitude of nine, how does one answer that question? you could always have and 9.5 occur. is there a rational way of addressing that? >> my explanation is one i know you understand. we look that up faults around the u.s. and have that information's. look at the historical record, but that the maximum earthquake, and with everything we do, we add margins, but we also looked at the specific location in relation to the fault. we considered the kinds of soil and rock formations between the fault location and the site, and analysis to see the ground motion that would actually be seen at the site. and we design for an earthquake of a certain size. i am falling into the trap of saying of a certain size, of the ground motion of a certain magnitude. having said that, with all these other things, severe accident management guideline, the b five b procedures, we have procedures and equipment in place that says, even if we were wrong and the plant suffered this serious event, we have in f
their involvement, allowing for no troops on the ground. the libyan story, japan story, and the budget situation at home. the continuing resolution that punts the decisions on the budget until the beginning of april. they left town this friday morning. we would like to hear which of these stories are most important to you this friday morning. let's begin with a call from san antonio, texas. robert on the independent line. caller: am i on? good morning. i wanted to say that the most significant story i believe is what is happening in the middle east with all of these uprisings and the people wanting democracy. i find it very significant, even though all of these things are happening across the world like japan, i find this very significant because even though america has not intervened with these countries to try to make than democracies, they themselves have tried to make themselves free of dictators and other powers that they did not have control of. host: robert, what do you think of this particular instance with the united nations out suggesting military force is appropriate in libya? caller:
for the continued cooperation between our countries. we're obviously following what is happening in japan on a minute-by-minute basis. ireland has generously contributed to the appeal for humanitarian assistance. we are also grateful for the offer of irish experts to assist in dealing with this. both ireland and united states know that japan has been generous in the past three timess' -- during others' of need. the conversation that we had about libya began with the passage of the un security council resolution 1973, which provides authority to the international community to take enforcement actions to protect civilians in libya. the libyan people have called for international assistance. this resolution paves the way for that call to be answered. colonel gaddafi's refusal to hear the repeated calls, up until now, to halt violence against his own people, has left us with no other choice but to pursue this course of action. while this resolution is an important step, it is only that -- an important step. we and our partners will continue to explore the most important -- expected measures t
at noathat is furloughed for 21 days, if you live in japan or you live on the pacific coast or there are some tornadoes in the midwest, tough luck. we had to furlough those employees who would have warned you to evacuate the low-lying areas in the oregon-california coast and in hawaii but, no, they have targeted massive cuts at the noaa budget. $450 million. it's estimated that noaa would have, because of the time of year, 21 days of furloughs for all its employees. $110 million in cuts to the national weather service. a big cut to state disaster preparedness plans. so right now our emergency operation centers in oregon, in california, in hawaii are in full swing, and the reason that they are able to be in touch with people in scattered coastal communities, in relatively difficult areas is because of the federal assistance that we've given to them to set up these centers. and under the republicans' budget, we would cut $206 million from state emergency operation centers. now, where are the states going to get the money in this ba climate? i guess those places won't be tended to either. we won
. our hearts and prayers are with the people of japan in the wake of the earthquake and tsunami. in alaska, the memory of the devastating 1964 earthquake are still with us. we know we're just beginning to comprehend the magnitude of the earthquake and its devastation. we share and support the president's commitment to bring america's resources to bear to help japan recover. we commend the actions he has taken so far. this tragedy as well as the upheaval in the middle east and north africa served as stark reminders of how intertwined our world economy is. world events beyond our control can affect all of us. it makes it all the more important that we control the things we can. i want to speak with you about one of the threats we are experiencing personally. that is rising energy prices. i want to share some of the steps republicans are ready to take right now. the steps will protect america from international conflicts, create thousands of new jobs, reduce our budget deficit, and help bring energy prices back down to earth. nationwide, gasoline prices have risen by 40 cents over
will continue to stand with the people of japan in their greatest hour of need. as we respond to these immediate crises abroad, we also will not let up in our efforts to tackle the pressing challenges facing our country, including accelerating economic growth. that is why, over the weekend, i will be in latin america. one of the main reasons for my trip is to strengthen economic partnerships abroad and to create good jobs at home. latin america is a part of the world where the economy is growing very quickly. where economies grow, so do demands for goods and services. the question is, where are these goods and services going to come from? as president, i want to make sure these products are made in america. i want to open more markets around the world so that american companies can do more business and hire more people. let me explain why this is important. every $1 billion of goods and services we exports supports more than 5000 jobs in the united states. so, the more we sell overseas, the more jobs we create on our shores. that is why last year i set a goal for this country to double our expor
work. in light of the ongoing events in japan, a want to take a minute to talk about nuclear power. right now, america gets one- fifth of our electricity from nuclear energy. it is important to recognize that nuclear energy does not emit carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. those of us who are concerned about climate change, we have to recognize that nuclear power if it is safe can make a significant contribution to the climate change question. i am determined to ensure that it is safe. in light of what is happening, i have requested a comprehensive safety review by the nuclear regulatory commission to make sure that all of our nuclear energy facilities are safe. we will incorporate those conclusions and lessons from japan in design and the building of the next generation of plants. but we simply cannot take it off the table. my administration is leading global discussions toward a new international framework in which all countries who are operating nuclear plants are making sure they are notbut more broadly, an energy standard can expand the scope of clean energy investments because
association. >> video this morning courtesy of al-jazeera. this is the nuclear reactor in japan. according to the associated press, an explosion there destroyed a building housing the reactor. and also there are fears that it could melt down after being hit by the earthquake and tsunami there in japan. again, those reports saying that large amounts of radiation were coming out in the evacuation around the plant expanded. but officials didn't know how dangerous at this time the leak was to people. again that courtesy there from al-jazeera this morning of the plant. now, in related use, there are also reports this morning as far as those who are affected, 1,300 dead, 2,000 people in emergency shelters. as you see there, people waiting on top of buildings to be rescued by various means this morning. this courtesy of n.h.k. and also there and 50,000 emergency crews. we registered in finding out from you in our first 45 minutes this morning if what we were seeing in japan, not only with the disaster, but also in the reaction from the japanese authorities there, could prove threatening for the u
about recent events in japan. he said u.s. officials do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the u.s. the president visited the japanese embassy to sign a condolence book for victims of last week's earthquake and tsunami. >> i will be making a statement later this afternoon. my main purpose for being here is to communicate how heartbroken the american people are over this tragedy. we are doing everything we can to stand by our great friend and ally, japan. our deepest sympathies, or thoughts and prayers are with the families. we feel a great urgency to provide assistance to those who have been displaced from their homes, who are suffering enormously at this moment. as i said on the first day of the tragedy, i am confident that japan will rebuild. it has people who are strong and resilient, who are dedicated to their country, who are brilliant. as difficult as this time is up, i am confident that japan will emerge even stronger than before. >> [unintelligible] >> i am will discuss that this afternoon. >> thank you very much. >> after visiting the japanese embassy in washington
national cable satellite corp. 2011] . . a big part of the story today in japan. the headline to date is a partial meltdown at two separate reactors. there is a lot being written here about the u.s. nuclear program as well. a headline in "the washington post." "safety concerns continue to hinder the sector." we wanted to rescue a bit more about this this morning. this is making most of the headlines at this point. what should the effect be a hone u.s. nuclear program? for republicans, 202-737-0001. for democrats, 202-737-0002. for independents, 202-628-0205. we will get to your calls in a couple of minutes. jonathan sobel is online with us. paint a picture of japan. caller: i am supposed to -- i suppose that we will start with the nuclear situation. they have started to pour see water on the nuclear reactors to cool them down. remember, there was a dramatic explosion yesterday from hydrogen building up in the first one. >> talk to us about the concerns -- host: talk to us about the concerns. caller: we are getting regular updates from outside the plant. they are peaking as the authori
on the nuclear reactors in japan after last week's work -- earthquake and tsunami. the head of the commission and deputy energy secretary spoke to reporters at the white house for 25 minutes. >> good afternoon. over the weekend the president was briefed multiple times on the situation in japan on the earthquake there. usaid is leading our humanitarian efforts with the department of energy and nuclear regulatory commission. in national security adviser is coordinating a process with regards to japan and the engaging with officials across the government. he is keeping you -- we know you have a lot of questions with regard to nuclear issues. you keep answering questions about american citizens in japan as well as generally of date americans about the impact of the accidents or the aftermath of the tsunami and earthquake. i also have our deputy secretary of energy. we can at mind everything we're doing -- al everything. i will ask these two gentlemen to speak. if you could address questions related to them and we will let them get out of here and i will take questions on other issues. thanks very
in japan. labor leader ed miliband as the prime minister for an update on the situation in libya and other arab leaders are still in support of coalition operations there. >> this morning i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others, and in addition to my duties in the house, i shall have further such meetings later today. >> i thank the prime minister for the answer and associate myself, and all on this side of the house, with his moving tribute to providential crier. the prime minister has taken the right decision to extend the life of the nimrod's and hms cumberland so that our armed forces remain eager to protect in this conflict. he knows the uncertainty we now face, so will he, in due course, extend that rethink of our defense to abilities? >> obviously we should be able to deploy at speed anywhere in the world with flexible on forces with particular emphasis on transport and on things like special forces. i think we did anticipate the sorts of things we're doing now but if there are for the lessons to learn, of course -- and the. >> our hearts go out to the people of japan
him. so now he is in something -- like crabs coming out of japan, being pulled down by everyone. what is right? what is wrong? president bush was too fast to go into war. they say he is too slow. he is going to take his time to see if he is right and do the right thing by people, not just black people, ever ready. this man loves everybody. you got white people that created this mess and that is coming down on him like he did it. something is wrong with this world. we see things going on and look at it in an abstract way. was notthis war started by president obama. we did not start having money shortage from president obama. he is the first black african american president. you white people sitting around a pole and give your opinion about things. -- around tables and give your opinions about things. you always have done best. this. guehost: our thanks to al- jazeera that is showing us what is going on in libya. from "the new york times", the allies open the air assault on gaddafi forces. residents interviewed. there was heavy fighting and the city center and pro-gaddafi snipers could
days, if you live in japan or you live on the pacific coast or there are some tornadoes in the midwest, tough luck. we had to furlough those employees who would have warned you to evacuate the low-lying areas in the oregon-california coast and in hawaii but, no, they have targeted massive cuts at the noaa budget. $450 million. it's estimated that noaa would have, because of the time of year, 21 days of furloughs for all its employees. $110 million in cuts to the national weather service. a big cut to state disaster preparedness plans. so right now our emergency operation centers in oregon, in california, in hawaii are in full swing, and the reason that they are able to be in touch with people in scattered coastal communities, in relatively difficult areas is because of the federal assistance that we've given to them to set up these centers. and under the republicans' budget, we would cut $206 million from state emergency operation centers. now, where are the states going to get the money in this bad climate? i guess those places won't be tended to either. we won't know the tidal waves
, whether confronting japan or libya. it is hard to balance those. he did get some criticism from the republican national committee and others that maybe he should not have taken the time to go on espn announce his picks just as the nuclear crisis in japan was unfolding. the white house was saying that he can walk and chew gum at the same time. host: the president is in rio talking business. guest: i think there is not only a political issue with that, but he will get criticized for that as well. you can make the argument, and the white house makes the argument on one side, and the other side says it is important that he be in the moment of what is going on here. this all plays into a mentality out there in parts of the country, part of the heartland especially, that he is not as pro-america as other people think he is. i think that plays into all of this. you're filling out brackets and playing golf, you are in brazil when you might be doing other things, it makes people wonder. when you go to the voting booth, you do not vote on public policy issues as much as you do with your h
about japan. they are our second largest creditor after china. the you think there is any risk that in order to respond to the disaster and support their economy in the aftermath, that the japanese will have to resort to selling some of their treasury holdings to raise cash? do you see this having any impact on treasury prices in u.s. interest rates? >> i do not. i should say, senator, that we should all extend our thoughts and concerns to japan. it is an extraordinary challenge for them. it is a very hot -- it has a very high savings rate and it has the ability to deal not just with the humanitarian but the construction challenges they have to face ahead. >> center moran. -- senator moran. >> short of overall gse reform, what steps could we take today, short of that two-year period that secretary geithner manchin, that would encourage capital formation, the return of the private sector into the housing market? >> we highlighted the fact that there were things we could do to gradually phase out the government's role. we have to get these rules into place for banks and investors
this morning of some of the aftermath of the tsunami in japan. you can see the flooding and fighters. let me show you a couple of other pictures. this is from china. look at the floating vehicles submerged and the flooded streets in the miyagi region of japan. this is what it was like for people in a bookstore in a japanese city as the ceiling started to fall in the aftermath of the earthquake. big, international story affecting millions of people on the pacific rim and lots of news coverage will be coming out as the death tolls become clear and also the damage. we are going to talk national politics today and we want to move to wisconsin. with the union vote in the assembly, the legislation is now sent to the governor for a signature. a reporter for "the wisconsin state journal" is on the phone with us. tell us about what the mood was like inside the chamber as the legislation passed. guest: hostile. there was about an hour or two of debate yesterday. the republicans called off debate and voted as they filed out of the chamber. their democratic colleagues, along with some protesters shouted
. news out of japan this morning, after a third explosion yesterday at the nuclear power facility. all eyes are on the situation there. we will keep you updated as we go along this morning. we begin with your thoughts on whether military retirees should pay more for health care? secretary gates is expected to make another push to require retirees to pay more in fees. congressional debates on the issue begins wednesday. we have a special line for retirees and active members. all others, you can see the lines they are separated by democrats and republicans and independents. let's take a look at an article about this on this morning. defense secretary gates finds himself pitted against retired service members, one of washington's powerful and most beloved constituencies. date is back with a far more modest proposal to raise premiums. we want to get your thoughts on this this morning. what do you think? a little bit more from the "washington post." we will go to kevin who is a democrat in baton rouge, louisiana. caller: i think that everybody, especially the situation that the country is i
, president obama spoke at the white house about the recent events in japan. he said that u.s. officials to not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the u.s.. the president visited the japanese embassy to sign a condolence book for the victims of last week's earthquake in tsunami. >> selling and making a statement later today. my main purpose is to state how -- we do everything we can to stand by and the spirit we feel a great urgency to provide assistance to those who have been displaced from their homes and you are suffering enormously at this moment. as i have said, i am confident that japan will rebuild. it has people who are strong, resilient, who are dedicated to their country, few are brilliant. as the vocal does this is, i'm confident that japan will emerge. >> it means a lot to all japanese. thank you very much. >> after visiting the japanese embassy in washington, president obama spoke more about the events in japan over the past week. he defended the u.s. government recommendation that u.s. citizens with live-in -- living within a 50 mile radius of the power plant shoul
that is furloughed for 21 days, if you live in japan or you live on the pacific coast or there are some tornadoes in the midwest, tough luck. we had to furlough those employees who would have warned you to evacuate the low-lying areas in the oregon-california coast and in hawaii but, no, they have targeted massive cuts at the noaa budget. $450 million. it's estimated that noaa would have, because of the time of year, 21 days of furloughs for all its employees. $110 million in cuts to the national weather service. a big cut to state disaster preparedness plans. so right now our emergency operation centers in oregon, in california, in hawaii are in full swing, and the reason that they are able to be in touch with people in scattered coastal communities, in relatively difficult areas is because of the federal assistance that we've given to them to set up these centers. and under the republicans' budget, we would cut $206 million from state emergency operation centers. now, where are the states going to get the money in this bad climate? i guess those places won't be tended to either. we won't know t
are recognized. ms. berkley: i rise today to express my sympathy to the people of japan as they are being threatend and i reject calls for more wasteful spending, $100 billion more of wasteful spending on the yucca mountain project in response to japan's nuclear tragedy. dumping radioactive waste located inside a volcanic zone 90 miles outside of las vegas will only increase the danger to americans from radioactive wastes produced at nuclear power plants. they call for waste shipments to be unleashed on communities across the united states that are unprepared to deal with the death and destruction that this radioactive garbage can cause, whether it's a tragic accident involving a trainor a truck carrying nuclear waste or a 9/11 terrorist attack on one shipment, the risk to human lives and billions in economic damage are staggering. let's start focusing on securing the waste at existing sites stored in bunkers geared to keep this material isolated from our fellow citizens. what we are witnessing in japan, these pro-dump forces should be -- concerns as safeguarding lives above concerns abov
one thing about the earthquake in japan. we do not know what the impacts of the earthquake are inside of the reactor building specifically. that is our most the equivalent -- equipment of interest to us would be located. it may have survived perfectly well and state perfectly functional, or there may be damage that we just do not know about. we need to see what the inspection results are once they have access to the plant. but our reviews for the u.s. include -- it is always very site-specific. for earthquakes, if you're in a very soft soil environment, there is not a very challenging review that is required or analysis that is required on earthquakes. but it might be that you need a storm surge for a hurricane or a storm surge for a tsunami. you do not take every possible current dividend and pile them all together into one evened, so it has done more on and isn't it-by-event basis. >> i think it is more generally, how do we consider separate design bases events -- and do we consider design basis events separately or do we consider all the design basis events continuously on a plan?
this month. usa today has a story about the situation in japan growing and have an impact here in the united states. we will talk about exports and imports and how this plays into japan later on in the program. before our last phone call, i want to show you what colonel gaddafi had to say late yesterday evening about the situation in libya. >> all the muslim armies have to take part in this battle against the crusaders. their protest all over the world to help you come in asia, and africa, in america, in europe. they are people against their own leaders. we will been -- we will win, we will be victorious, we will not surrender. host: an independent in north carolina, your the last phone call. what do you think? caller: thank god for c-span and. i am from south carolina, and only heard it once, our leaders met behind closed doors, which is illegal. i keep hearing about going to cut, going to cut. i walked into my nearby pharmacy and they didn't know and i did not know that my medicaid had been cut. and they were not -- i'm a diabetic with kidney failure, but i could not get my insulin pills o
come back from a trip to japan. we're now here in washington talking as we tape this. you were there to cover another extraordinary story overseas. what i am trying to understand is, why did you make that trip? if you answer me, because it was a great story, that is done enough. you have so many responsibilities that cut into a decision. why you do that? why did you make the trip to japan? >> i wish i could say that it was a science and theory. a lot of it is, i feel compelled to go. it is not his that i covered the tsunami in indonesia or southeast asia, but i felt it was a story i had to experience tangibly. this incredible constellation of disasters -- at that moment, i felt there was a reason for the entire broadcast to be there. part of being an anchor is a decision, where are your best their anchoring? the anchor of a really race. -- relay race. when is the best for you to take the whole broadcasting go overseas? it does change that balance. in the middle east, there were a host of correspondence to rivera and you were fantastic. " -- who were there and who worked fantast
they had done something or spent money going to japan? >> >> no, and i can honestly say to you -- this is "candide," but i don't know of a single time in my entire career when i could not cover the story wanted or a broadcaster was on could not cover the story they wanted because of money. i have never heard that. they have never said we cannot afford to cover that story. >> do you remember 30 years ago that you could do these kind of things without anybody questioning it because the budget was so much larger and there were fewer people watching after you with money? there are many more people today want to have you on monday. you seem to be in the middle of the storm without affecting you. if >> i am not insulated. i believe if we go to the management and we say we need to cover this story, we get to cover that story. i think that there are decisions probably made that don't always come to me, but they don't bring them to mate. if we feel that this is central to what we do, we can say let's do it. look at the way we covered the middle east. truly, with a number of people deplo
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